Japan – part 2: Tokyo

This is part 2 of our two week trip to Japan in April. Part 1 covered the basics of traveling there and the foodie highlights. At the end of the post there is a map showing most of the places we went to. Tokyo is huge, so plan your days carefully.

Experiencing Tokyo – the first three days

We arrived at Narita airport mid-morning and picked up our Japan rail passes from the airport station to save some time later in the week. Since we were going to be in Tokyo for a while, we bought rail passes with a later starting date and booked the Shinkansen fast trains accordingly. While waiting in line for the train pass, we got our first taste of Japanese cuisine from a well-stocked 7/11-store when we bought some seaweed covered rice balls, a snack staple later on our trip.

So many fillings to choose from, so easy to eat on the go.

Then we bought our rechargeable Tokyo public transportation card and off we went into Tokyo. Our first stop was the neighborhood Asakusa for two nights. We stayed in a tiny but clean AirBnB very close to the temple area, perfect for our short stay of three nights in Asakusa.

Asakusa – temple area

The cherry blossoms were in bloom as we walked around the big temple area in Asakusa. Lots of people everywhere and very camera friendly. People (mostly tourists) were walking around in kimonos. Our first snack was a taiyaki, a fish-shaped pancake with a red bean or sweet potato filling.  Later on, we also had steamed meat buns for lunch and then some green tea Kitkats. Those Kitkats actually became an obsession during the trip, as well as other unique Japanese flavors we could find in the many, many convenience and grocery stores we went into.

Our first dinner was a tonkatsu meal in the Hamakatsu restaurant an easy train ride away. By the taste of that fried pork chop and its condiments, we knew we were in for an excellent trip foodwise. The Asahi beer was perfect to go with the meal.

Matsugaya, Ueno park and Ginza

The next day, we continued our walk around the Asakusa temples and then went into the Matsugaya area. There are tons of specialized stores there on different streets, for example the kitchenware stores. I almost bought a Hello Kitty rice ball shaper, so cute!

Then we stocked up on supplies for a picknick lunch and went to Ueno park. When the cherry trees are in bloom, there’s a constant family party in the park. After our picnic, we perused the food stalls and had some grilled sakura flavored marshmallows, more steamed buns and beer. It was a great day in the sunny weather.

When night fell, we went into the Ginza area for some shopping and then had our first bowl of ramen from a small noodle shop. We chose our meals from a number of plastic displays, got a ticket from a machine and then the noodle bowl was made to order. So tasty!

For dessert, we went to one of those uniquely Japanese places – a maid café in Chiyoda. This was one of the larger, more family-friendly chains (Maidreamin) but it was still kind of weird to see young Japanese girls dance around us in their maid costumes. We had some ice-cream and cake which were decorated at the table with cute drawings of bunnies and cats. Then it was back to Asakusa for us by metro, and we took a stroll around the well-lit temple area as well.

Tsukiji fishmarket and Nakajima tea house

We had kind of an early start and went to the Tsukiji fishmarket after a quick breakfast at a pancake place. Although most of the fish market has since relocated, we went when the wholesale interior part of the market was still up and running. We came after the big morning rush but were still able to see the fish mongers run around with carts of ice and so many kinds of fish and seafood. There were some kinds of fish that I have absolutely no idea what it was, along with some huge tunas. Although it was too early for sushi for us, we bought some condiments at one of the many shops next to the fish market.

Since it was still mid-morning, we walked to the Hamarikyu park. In the park, there is a lake with the teahouse Nakajima-no-ochaya next to it. We entered (shoes off of course!) and enjoyed a traditional cup of tea on the veranda. It consisted of a cup of matcha tea and a traditional pretty sweet, along with precise instructions for how to drink and eat. Such a great moment to remember! The matcha’s bitterness matched the sweet pastry perfectly and the surroundings were just beautiful.

The weather was excellent so we kept walking and went into the Hibiya park. There were temples, rock gardens, lakes and cherry blossoms so a great place to visit. After a tonkatsu lunch, we picked up our luggage and took the metro to our next area of stay, Shibuya.

And this concludes the first part of the Tokyo posts. We did so much in Tokyo in our five days there that there will be a second part, based in Shibuya.

Next: Two weeks in Japan – part 2.1: Even more Tokyo

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *